Built on Narrow Land

Kenneth Frampton is a architect, critic, historian and the Ware Professor of Architecture at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University, New York.

He is well known for his writing on twentieth-century architecture. His books include Modern Architecture: A Critical History (1980; revised 1985, 1992 and 2007) and Studies in Tectonic Culture (1995). Frampton achieved great prominence (and influence) in architectural education with his essay “Towards a Critical Regionalism” (1983) — though the term had already been coined by Alexander Tzonis and Liliane Lefaivre. Also, Frampton’s essay was included in a book The Anti-Aesthetic. Essays on Postmodern Culture, edited by Hal Foster, though Frampton is critical of postmodernism. Frampton’s own position attempts to defend a version of modernism that looks to either critical regionalism or a ‘momentary’ understanding of the autonomy of architectural practice in terms of its own concerns with form and tectonics which cannot be reduced to economics (whilst conversely retaining a Leftist viewpoint regarding the social responsibility of architecture).

While here he gave a lecture titled Masters on Modernism at the Wellfleet Library and has subsquently served as a juror for our 2013 Add-on ’13 competition.

ccmhtKenneth Frampton